Twitter: Watching You Watch the Super Bowl Ads

by Laura Fitton on February 2, 2009

When millions of us are riveted by a common experience, Twitter lights up. Sure enough, though I’m sitting on a bus bound for New York City, I know the Doritos and Audi ads were good, the Bud Light ads were iffy and that Hulu just rocked the house. Also, in a suprising turn for the Super Bowl, the game suddenly got good at the end.

What happens on Twitter when Super Bowl Ads air shows how businesses COULD and SHOULD listen, learn and engage. Twitter is a real-time consumer sentiment engine. Companies that learn the territory and design or deploy smart tools can extract real value in these tough times.

My roundup of tonight’s Super Bowl Ads on Twitter aggregation plays for your armchair-account executive-quarterbacking pleasure:

Thanks to many readers’ replies, I know that @etradebaby, @overstockdotcom, @danperry of Cars.com and @sobeworld are all engaging live during the game. Twitter veteran @scottmonty (Ford) has been commenting about Ford and Super Bowl ads. @DunkinDonuts didn’t blip when their ad aired. Any others?

Mack Collier noted that no ad has presented a Twitter name. Remember when www.companyname.com was novel in ads? Mack’s right: @twitternames are next.

Smart consumer brands and market intelligence companies will build powerful tools to track and analyze this consumer sentiment engine. They can capture the masses of tweets for both quantitiative and qualitative analysis. The mass response of Twitterdom is a novelty though. Companies must dig in deeper and learn to parse groups and waves of sentiment. Study how communities cohere and disband around hot trending terms, come to understand what specific consumer segments feel and continue to fine-tune, Twitter as an increasingly valuable – but not obtrusive – business tool.

Here’s to hoping this will always be done responsibly, with an emphasis on providing better services and goods and building stronger mutually beneficial relationships.

Watch the ads themselves on Hulu

(Does it work? Don’t ask me. I’m sipping the web thru a wifi straw and making mental notes on which ads to bother looking for later on Hulu. Thanks Twitter!)

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{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

James Artre February 2, 2009 at 4:52 pm

Excellent post, again. Love your insights and “sociological” perspectives, especially: “Companies must dig in deeper and learn to parse groups and waves of sentiment. Study how communities cohere and disband around hot trending terms, come to understand what specific consumer segments feel and continue to fine-tune..”

Again, excellent post.

James Artre

Chris Cavallucci February 2, 2009 at 6:33 pm

It was great watching the game last night and seeing your tweets about which companies were engaged during the game. What’s the next collective experience you’ll be monitoring?

Todd Van Hoosear February 2, 2009 at 6:33 pm

H&R Block (@HRBlock) was also live tweeting during the game. They held a couple contests, one where people could guess who did the voiceover for “Death” (it was Abe Vigoda, a.k.a. “Fish”, who, contrary to popular belief is NOT dead — making it a pretty funny and yet entirely unappreciated inside joke, as the commercial wasn’t very well received).

Oh, incidentally, Abe Vigoda may or may not tweet at @abevigoda — but I suspect not. :-)

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